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The Writer’s Journey: from Inspiration to Publication

Thanks to Cornelia J. Glynn – Open Age member and writer – who has recommended The Writer’s Journey: from Inspiration to Publication a book and the work of Julia McCutchen – an author, conscious writing coach, intuitive mentor, and the founder & creative director of the International Association of Conscious & Creative Writers (IACCW).

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“A former publisher of books on spiritual and personal development, Julia teaches conscious creativity, conscious writing and a holistic approach to writing for publication which combines the inner journey of creative self-discovery with the practical steps required for writing and publishing books, articles and all forms of written communication.”

It looks like a very inspiring book and Julia’s websites are certainly worth checking out for inspiration around ‘conscious creativity and writing’: http://www.juliamccutchen.com/

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A Day in the Life – Creative Writing Inspiration

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Here’s an inspiring photography project on Feature Shoot about A Day in the Life of single elderly women in New York City, USA.

In Life Ever After photographer Patrícia Monteiro shows how four women in their 80s and 90s, living alone, live life to the full: soaking up the art, culture, social activities and life in this buzzing city.

“In these four women, the photographer found fiercely independent souls, constantly evolving and engaged with the goings on around them. Despite physical difficulties—Rita, for instance, has a few disabilities—each pursues her interests with as much fervor as ever.”

“At this age, the women have seen the deaths of lifelong friends and companions, but they have learned to cope with loss. Their late husbands are abiding fixtures in their lives, and Sonia still wears her wedding band. Rita got giddy reminiscing on her boyfriend, Molly shared relationship advice. At one time, they all had careers. A few of them shared photographs from their pasts, although nostalgia was sometimes tinged with heartache. For the most part, explains the photographer, the women didn’t dwell on or concern themselves with thoughts of their mortality, focusing their attentions instead on the joys of the day-to-day.”

Today’s Creative Writing Exercise: A Day in the Life..

Write about a day in your own life, or in the life of a neighbour, or a friend… It can be fictional or biographical, a short story or poem – let your imagination decide! But use Patricia Monteiro’s inspiring photography project as a springboard to get your creative ideas flowing!

You can see more of Monteiro’s photography here:

http://www.patriciapmonteiro.com/life-ever-after/

Light – A Writing Activity

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The days are getting longer, very gradually. This exercise gets you thinking about light, and the many forms in which it appears.

  • Think about daylight first. Each morning, thank goodness without fail, the sunlight gradually greets us. Think about its qualities. Maybe there’s a particularly memorable dawn you once saw, and a story around it which you want to tell. Think about the sheer power of the light from the sun – it can even be dangerous – if we’re driving and momentarily blinded, or when it causes skin cancer, or if we use a magnifying glass to focus its rays. Maybe there’s a fictional story to create in which a character is momentarily blinded by the sun and risks his / her life, or someone else’s.
  • When the natural light lessens then artificial lights come on – street lamps, house lights, headlights. And twilight is an in-between time when perceptions change, a time symbolic of near-endings, dwindlings, and change generally. Maybe something particular happens for you or your character at this time.
  • And how about when it’s night…. There’s the cold light of the moon, reflecting the light from the sun. There’s the monthly full moon, with all its associations of wildness (literally lunacy) or romance. There are stars, each shining with a different quality of light – some twinkle rose-pink, some glimmer white – and often planes pass overhead slowly with tail and wing lights blinking. Shooting stars, or satellites, sometimes delight us. Maybe you once stayed out at night lying on the ground watching the stars and the night sky. Maybe you were an expert on the constellations as an avid science student. At night, the lit windows of trains hurry down the tracks, the windows of houses offer a small yellow square in the dark. Maybe you see something through one of these windows, maybe even something secret, something you shouldn’t have seen.
  • Maybe you have a favourite lamp, or there’s a lampshade you inherited, and it has a story to tell.
  • Maybe the light from your mobile phone stops you sleeping at night and you’re exhausted, and you want to sing about it.
  • Maybe you want to create an exciting story about something that happened in the dark – in a forest when someone’s torch stopped working, in an ancient imaginary cave when the fire went out, in a cellar at the bottom of a house.
  • Maybe you’ll choose to imagine what it’s like to go blind and lose light – or, conversely, to gain too much of it – to enter the long, sleepless Scandinavian summer waiting for a restful night-time that won’t arrive?

Real or fictional, write a story in which light is important.

[this exercise is derived from Jo Bell’s marvellous blog of writing exercises called “52”, one for every week of the year

https://fiftytwopoetry.wordpress.com/

Look out for a soon-to-be-launched book of writing activities by Jo Bell, based on her blog]

Short and Sweet Advice For Writers: Stop Putting Yourself Down

Fantastic words of advice to boost writers’ confidence and self belief – from Jamie Lee Wallace

Live to Write - Write to Live

girl pig insultIf you’re like most writers (even the working ones), you would like to spend more time (and make more money) writing. You might write as a side hustle, pro bono, or “just for fun.” Or, if you’re like me, you might make your living writing, but only because you do a lot of commercial (vs. creative) work – copywriting, content marketing, etc.

My writing life includes bits of each of these scenarios. I make my living writing website content, ebooks, reports, blog posts, etc. for corporate, business-to-business (B2B) clients mostly in the technology and marketing industries. I take on the occasional side project to write a paid feature for an arts or lifestyle magazine. I also write a bi-weekly column for my local paper as a pro bono gig. And, finally, I journal, blog, and write fiction “just for fun.”

That’s a lot of writing.

Still, when someone asks what…

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Monday Motivation!

Winter Writing Prompts

Here are some great winter writing prompts with photographs to inspire you…
Grab a cup of hot cocoa, snuggle up on the sofa, or get settled in your favourite writing spot… and check out these wonderful writing prompts by Chris Dunmire at Creativity Portal – Click on the text below to view the prompts:

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Cold, snowy winter weather! Looking for some inspiration or the “write” kind of prompting for the winter and Christmas season? Never fear, look right here! These cool writing prompts and photos will help facilitate your creative stories, blog entries, and holiday reflections for the winter season and melt any icy writing blocks you’ve been chipping away at. Grab your writing shovel and dig in!

Stepping into Vaughan Williams’ shoes

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Interesting post about an Open Age music workshop in partnership with Westminster Libraries. Why not listen to some music such as classical or jazz to help get your creative ideas and pen flowing?

Books & the City

Behind the Lines: The music and composers of the First World WarJust when you thought Westminster Music Library’s Behind the Lines programme* was drawing to a close, along comes another workshop, featuring the First World War music of Ralph Vaughan Williams.

This was a specially commissioned adult music workshop for members of Open Age, an organisation with whom Westminster Music Library has forged a fond and fruitful relationship in recent years.

Thanks to generous funding from the Vaughan Williams Charitable Trust, we were able to re-enlist musicians from The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra to facilitate a workshop, focusing on the life and music of Vaughan Williams during The Great War, a composer who holds a special place in our hearts as he opened the library to the public in 1948.

This was also to be a morning of ceremony as we were joined by two distinguished guests – Lt. Cdr Tony Pringle and Honorary Alderman Frances Blois – the former to present…

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Writing can heal

Here is an inspiring blog post by Cristiani Mihai…

Cristian Mihai

writing_healing“Writing eases my suffering . . . writing is my way of reaffirming my own existence.”  – Gao Xingian

Have you ever asked yourself why is it that people write? Why is it that they feel this urge?

Perhaps they do so because they don’t want to forget. Or maybe because they write differently from what they think, and only in writing do they find the freedom they so desperately need.

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The Unexpected Hand

Here’s an inspiring writing prompt from Adrian Lilly’s blog to get your creative juices flowing… could be a thriller, a ghost story or even a love story! We would love to see what your imagination comes up with!

ADRIANLILLY.COM

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I supply the mayhem, you try to survive. Imagine walking in late one night–alone–and reaching for the light switch…

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